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DIY Front Door Round Welcome Sign With The Cricut Explore Air 2

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Grab your Cricut Explore Air 2 and make this easy DIY Round Welcome Sign for your front door!


This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of Cricut. This post contains affiliate links, however, all opinions are 100% mine.

Hi lovelies! I’m back with another awesome Cricut DIY, this time for your front door!

I actually created this sign WEEKS ago and I’m just getting around to sharing it with you guys…

finished round wood farmhouse welcome sign
finished round wood farmhouse welcome sign

It seems like summer activities have been pulling at us in every direction, and Chris and I are struggling to keep the three kiddos entertained while still being able to work from home.

But I’m happy that I’m finally able to type out this tutorial and give you guys the deets on making this easy front door round sign because it’s one of my favorites.

Did I already mention how easy it was to make?

Okay, good. 🙂

As always, I want to mention how much I LOVE seeing your crafts and creations, especially when I’ve helped you learn to do or create something new so please share them with me!

You can share your creations with me via Instagram (that’s where I’m the most active), here in the comments, by commenting on a Pinterest pin that inspired you, or by joining my e-mail newsletter and hitting ‘reply’ to one of the weekly e-mails I send to my wonderful readers.

Alright, let’s get down to business and make a round welcome sign together…

This post contains affiliate links at no cost to my readers, and all opinions are my own, as always. 

What You Need To Make Your DIY Front Door Round Sign

materials for diy round sign front door

I was able to create this DIY sign for just $25, which is $20-35 cheaper than what I would spend buying one outright!

Here’s what you need to make your own DIY round sign for your front door:

If you have been following my blog for a while, you’ve probably already seen my office refresh post featuring all of my Cricut materials! My Explore Air 2 is at the forefront because I create almost all of my DIYs, labels, and crafts with it.

It can accurately cut 100 different materials from iron-on, vinyl and paper, to specialty materials like glitter paper, cork, and bonded fabric.

diy round sign materials needed

It is versatile enough to cut materials like:

  • infusible ink
  • faux leather
  • corrugated corkboard
  • felt
  • magnetic sheets
  • party foil
  • printable fabric
  • washi tape
  • birch
  • wood veneer
  • and even a grocery bag!

See the full list of materials you can cut with the Explore Air 2 HERE.

It also has the ability to draw (here’s a super easy project I made using this function) and score using a Scoring Stylus.

Plus, it’s so easy to use and create with. I love connecting my machine via BlueTooth so I can design my project while taking care of the kids and my machine can be cutting my design out for me in the next room. 

It cuts quickly, efficiently, and has a setting for each material which makes it simple and quick to create with.

You can label and organize, make your own gifts or cards, and even craft and create home decor with it!

It’s truly worth the investment for any crafter, maker, or DIY-er, hands down!

How To Make A DIY Round Front Door Sign

diy round sign materials needed

First, measure your wood round with a ruler or tape measure. I recommend doing this first so you can mentally note what size decal you will need.

I’ve made the mistake of trying to measure things after I painted them and it’s not a HUGE deal, but it makes things tricky sometimes.

measuring round wood sign

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I’ve got roughly 13″ across the middle of my sign, and 9″ or so towards the bottom, so I’ll be making my Welcome lettering and design no more than 9″ wide.

Now that we’ve measured the wood, it’s time to paint!

For my wood round, I’m using white interior/exterior paint because this sign will be hanging outside.

You can use an old can of trim paint, craft paint, or paint samples you have on hand in the color of your choice, but take note of whether you have a covered porch or not, and consider if the type of paint you’re using will last!

I painted on two light coats, back to back, and laid my sign on an old cardboard box we had from our recent move.

For the second light coat, I made sure to brush the paint in the same direction along the front of the sign.

painted white round sign

Be sure to paint the rounded edges!

If you’re making these signs to sell, I would recommend painting the sign front and back.

Now that our sign is painted and drying, we have time to design and cut with the Explore Air 2.

I chose a Welcome lettering design in Design Space that you can access with Cricut Access (along with 100,000+ other incredible images, fonts (including those you have stored on your computer!), and exclusive deals on Cricut materials and MACHINES) as well as a leaf image.

I ‘Attached‘ the two images together so they would cut together as seen in the image below…
design space screenshot welcome sign

The Attach button is located towards the bottom right of the Cricut Design Space canvas and is represented by text and a paperclip icon. This option can be selected so your design cuts as you see it on the screen.

With your wood sign still drying, press a piece of permanent vinyl in the color of your choice material-side-up onto the blue LightGrip mat and feed it into the Explore Air 2.

Cut the vinyl on the proper setting with a fine-point blade, and remove when finished.

cutting vinyl on explore air 2

Weed excess material from your cut design, and burnish onto a piece of Cricut transfer tape.

For my sign, I used a staple gun and a long piece of twine to create a way to hang my sign. I used three staples on each side of the twine on the back of my sign for stability.

You can also use a hot glue gun!

attaching tine to back of sign to hang

When your wood sign is dry and no longer sticky (I had to wait about 2-3 hours but you may need to give yours more time depending on the type of paint used), apply your decal with transfer tape.

StrongGrip transfer tape is NOT recommended for this project.

applying transfer tape and decal to painted sign

Add any embellishment you want to, whether that be with ribbon or greenery to customize your sign.

I used some leftover buffalo check wired ribbon leftover from Christmas, an old ribbon belonging to a wreath, and some lamb’s ear sprigs I stole from our dining room centerpiece.
finished round sign ready to hang

Once our decal is on your sign, you can also add a finishing coat of polycrylic to seal everything in, but I didn’t find this step to be necessary, especially when using Cricut permanent vinyl

Once your sign is finished, hang it up on your front door for all of the neighbors to see!finished diy round sign on front door with bow and greenery

round sign front door finished

This was such a fun project and I’m so happy to finally be able to share it with all of my #slayathomebabes. 

If you liked this post, be sure to check out these other posts featuring the Cricut Explore Air 2:

Share your latest project or Cricut question with me in the comments below!

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Leticia

Friday 9th of April 2021

How did you attach the greenery and ribbon, I didn't see that in your instructions or I missed it. Thanks!!!

Corinne

Sunday 11th of April 2021

Hi! I used a staple gun :)

Amy

Wednesday 13th of January 2021

Hi! Where can I find the ruler that you use?

Corinne

Thursday 14th of January 2021

Hi Amy, here's the link to mine: https://amzn.to/3oWPVo1. I love using it to measure projects like this or when I'm sewing. :)

Judy

Saturday 2nd of January 2021

I got the explore 2 for Christmas and have been learning about it since then. Haven't fired it up yet, but think today I might be ready. Thanks for some great ideas that are great to begin with.

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